April 17, 2007

Two Kinds of People


So, in a discussion yesterday, I stumbled across a very intriguing conclusion.

One of us believed that "Man is inherently good." And that man will typically do the right thing because they know it's the right thing to do.

The other believed that "Man is inherently fallen." And that man will only do the right thing when there is a strong enough incentive in which to do so.

These differing viewpoints may be the true backbone from which opposing worldview and political schemas stem from. This also led me to wonder that perhaps Christians don't tend to be conservative simply because they're scared of gay people (even though this may be true, too), but because to become a Christian, at one time, you came to the realization that your heart was corrupt and you needed to be redeemed.

But for the man who believes man is naturally good (because they believe THEY are naturally good, and there probably isn't a heaven, but if there is, I'm good enough to get in), then a socialistic economy can work, because most people will try to work for the good of everybody.

2 comments:

Steve said...

So does the fact that I believe both exist within us with neither being necessarily dominant explain me being a moderate?

The thing is, is this something which is intrinsically more stressed in Protestant faiths? Because at least stereotypically you tend to hear about a lot more Catholic Democrats (Catholic Democrat is actually how I once described someone I knew who was very pro-life but disagreed with the Republicans on most other issues).

Sabai said...

yes, that is VERY interesting Steve. and makes me think that we're probably on to something here with this.

As far as "human nature being corrupt" being stressed in different denominations, I'm not sure. The Bible is clear that without God, none are good. So, since it's a Biblical thing, you would hope that it would be a Christian thing, universal.