June 05, 2007

Intelligent Design in Schools


What would the teaching of intelligent design in public schools actually consist of?

Does it really need to be given "equal" time in the classroom along with evolution? I think it can be summed up in 2-minutes. Just say that there's a lot of evidence that leads us in the direction of evolution, but that it is based on an assumption that we can't prove. So, some people believe that there must have been a divine Creator involved in the creation process, but that can not be proved either. But, here are a couple reasons why they think that:

Some scientists believe that the complexities of even the smallest living organisms are too marvelous to have been coincidentally created, and believe that a higher power must have had his hand in it.

Scientists like Augustine, through the dissection of humans made a statement, paraphrased here, "that as I learn more and more about the perfect symmetry of human anatomy, it would seem that we were perhaps created for beauty as much as utility."

Just get the kid to understand that science is based on assumption, as is faith. I'm not sure it's necessary to give them equal credence in the textbooks. After all, and I quote the E-Ching: "The truth shall outring what is loud."

1 comment:

JMC said...

Right. Besides, it is my understanding that the theory of intelligent design does not debunk the theory of evolution, just says that there are/were other forces at work as well. Sort of along the lines of intelligent design at first, then evolution. The argument for which is that certain extremely complex things, such as the eye, either work or don't, so how could they have "evolved," but once created, could have evolved as far as better vision, color vision, location on the head, size, etc.

Then obviously, stating the theories of evolution and intelligent design would each take about 2 minutes. Then the "process" of evolution would take the rest of the time. And since I assume these subjects are being taught in science class, the "process" of evolution is really the scientific part anyway.

Remember, they are both theories, and like theorems in math class, need to be proven. Once proven, they become axioms, but as of yet we still do not have the axiom of evolution or the axiom of intelligent design. (Sorry, it's the mathematician in me.)