April 07, 2009

Books for Skeptics/Seekers


I used to recommend The Case for Christ by Lee Strobel to my friends, even before the Bible, because of my belief that the resurrection is the primary hang-up they have to get through before considering the Bible shouldn't be treated like Aesop's Fables.

But, I've had a couple of friends who have found it difficult to get through. So, I think I might have skipped a step again.

Now, I'm recommending either Reason for God by Timothy Keller or Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis. Both of these start with the idea of God in the first place. Why we have it and if we need it? Lewis in particular uses compelling logic, wonderful for you philosophical-minded readers. Keller's book is a little bit easier to digest, and goes step by step through typical objections to reasonable faith.

Here's my suggestion. Go to your local library and see which one you might like. Read the first few chapters of one of them. If you don't like it, try the first few chapters of the other. If you still don't like it, give up. I'm ok with that. But, you've got to try. It's too important not to have an opinion on.

3 comments:

The Great I'm Not said...

I read Mere Christianity in high school and remember just nodding my head in agreement as it was reaffirming things I already believed. At this point I'm becoming more of a skeptic everyday. I'll have to pick this up and see what it does for me now.

Bobby Adult said...

I agree with The Great I'm Not. I need a book or something for getting me back into not being such a skeptic and a pessimist. Is it just a part of getting older that you become more jaded about everything? While religion, and more specifically "organized religion" is up there, I also mean faith in humanity and that there is a difference between right and wrong. Maybe its easy early in life because you just haven't been let down enough. And based on the attitudes of many adults I know, I fear it is only going to get worse.

Eric Olsen said...

exactly what this post is for. i think either of these might be good reads for you, bob.

and i don't think that skepticism in itself is bad. I just think too often we eliminate the possibilities of things that are indeed possible before weighing the evidence.