April 10, 2009

Good Friday


So, I understand how Good Friday got its name. The idea that now, we look back at Christ's death through the lens of the Easter resurrection, and therefore see this horrible act as a pure act of love, through which we now have hope for the problem of sin.

But, then why are church services on Good Friday still all dark, sad and candle-lit? It's like we're pretending we don't know what's coming.

6 comments:

Brent said...

Hah! That's like when someone was opposed to having an easter service on Saturday night--"He hasn't risen yet", they cried.

Um...

The Great I'm Not said...

I think the solemn nature of Friday services is pretty appropriate. The crucification is hardly something celebrate. We should feel pretty damn guilty that our sin required God to crucify his own son on our behalf.

Eric Olsen said...

just got back from our good friday service. i love the solemn nature of it, simply because i like a mellow worship vibe. but, eric, encouraging the idea of the forgiven intentionally returning to a mindset of guilt is ridiculous. the old has gone. the new has come. guilt is not an effective motivator for righteousness. guilt should not be a significant part of a believer's life.

as to brent, i'm CERTAIN i'm said that before.

Meghan said...

I think I always assumed the somber nature of the day was to remember how much He suffered and was tortured. Regardless of the reason and what was to happen 3 days later, we should still feel a little sadness, but not guilt, that this happened.

The Great I'm Not said...

I think its appropriate to try and feel what Christ felt on that day. I guess guilt isn't the right word.

LizM said...

I think even more than feeling how Christ felt (which is pretty much impossible), the day is important in that we can feel how those around him felt that day -- the Marys, Simon, John, and all the other disciples. We are so blessed, though, because unlike those people, we know the end of the story!