December 21, 2009

Marry for Money


Considering that "money problems" is one of the greatest reasons people give for getting divorced, should we should pay more attention to our potential partner's financial situation before we get hitched?

Yeah, that sounds bad. But, I think it's something we should think about more than we do. Because I have poor friends who fall in love with poor people (neither knowing about the other's financial situation), and simply put, it's really tough on them. Whereas falling in love with someone who has strong financial backing from their family can be a huge blessing, and allows you to start your marriage with one less giant thing to worry about.

So, don't marry for money. But, at least think about it.

7 comments:

David Vox Mullen said...

You're absolutely right. I mean Jesus was LOADED wasn't he? Wait, I was being sarcastic, but come to think of it. His father was a Jewish Carpenter. Had his own business. Allthough he left the family business, could be why he never married. Hrmmmmmmm

MicroGlyphics said...

Interesting concept. Money (or wealth) is ephemeral and so can be fleeting. If money is the core of a relationship, I suggest that the relationship is built on shifting sands. Younger people may marry more for the prospects of money (as in, "He just got his law degree."), but these prospects may not materialise. Moreover, many women (sorry Glorias) marry for money only to realise that they are still not happy. Even those who divorce, taking with themselves a chunk of change, discover that money does not buy happiness. Afterall, happiness comes from within, no? Who was it that said something about needles and camels? ;-)

MicroGlyphics said...

David, I am not sure you've got the lore straight. Did you say Jesus' dad was a Jewish carpenter?

Arcane Rest said...

I do not think that it is the amount but way money is handeled that causes the biggest issue. Sure some people are spenders and others are savers and they can live happily. However, when there is a huge despairity in spending and money becomes a trust issue, the end is near. One spouse will make a secret account or not show what they spent money on, driving a wedge between the two ultimately leading to a divorce with the reason of MONEY not trust.

Dianna said...

There have been quite a few stories in the news lately of formerly-loaded couples who have given up their big spending habits in favor of a more austere existence, and apparently have never been happier. So MAYBE the key is to marry rich, then give it all to charity after a year and downsize the family into a studio apartment.

Seriously, I wonder if it's not the pursuit of money itself (or even how it's handled) but just the expectations surrounding it that causes most of the problems. Couples who are loaded, but who know they might not be forever -- and are fine with that -- and poor couples who don't need or WANT the Porche or Benz might be equally content in their relationships, as long as they have realistic expectations going in.

But enough talk. I'm off to find me a millionaire!

Eric Olsen said...

Jesus' dad was most likely a carpenter. Trades were a family business.

I would never dare push for money to be the core of a relationship. Only posturing that it might become a factor.

Angela... said...

Marriage should be treated as the fiduciary contract it is...it really has nothing to do with love. If it did, there would be no state involvement in divorces.