December 10, 2009

Save Up For A Rainy Day


I always thought the phrase "save up for a rainy day" meant, "save up so that one day when it's rainy and you're bored, you can buy something awesome."

Seriously.

I recently watched the documentary IOUSA, which depicts how daunting America's future debt promises are, in the hopes of tipping the American populace toward the election of political candidates with true budget-neutral fiscal responsibility. It was in this movie where the directors used that phrase "save up for a rainy day", and discussed how most people born in the 80s never really understood the concept of saving in terms of "tragedy-protection."

So, my question is, what did you think the phrase "save up for a rainy day" meant? And in what decade were you born?

2 comments:

Meghan said...

I thought the same thing you did - I always thought it was saving so when you were bored (or a little down) you'd have money to buy yourself something fun. And I was born in the 80's. HOWEVER I do have a strong concept of saving, bestowed on me by my parents, and do understand the importance of an "emergency fund."

It's interesting because I would say that a lot of the people losing their homes to foreclosure and getting in massive amounts of credit card debt were born in the 60's/70's. And Bob heard recently that the majority of baby boomers don't have enough money for retirement. I don't know if this is a generational lack of education as much as the trend towards loose lending practices and the wide availability of credit to those who should never be granted it. Maybe both...

LizM said...

Saving for a rainy day always meant putting something aside for bad times (as in "when it rains, it pours")to this lady born in the 50s. So you might save for a sudden calamity such as a broken furnace or your car. Never because you might become unemployed. That wouldn't happen in a million years, would it?....