May 17, 2010

Free Co-Pay Healthcare Providers

Most of you have health insurance. You pay a monthly premium and when you show up to your doctor's appointment, you pay maybe a $30 co-pay.

That money goes to your insurance provider. Then the insurance provider pays the healthcare provider a varying amount, probably around $180 (the amount the insurance companies have agreed the service is worth - discounted for provider members).

So, how about this? You advertise yourself as a Free Co-Pay Healthcare Provider.

Now you're only getting a net gain of $150 ber patient (because you have to pay the patient's $30 co-pay to the insurance provider yourself)

But think of all the hypochondriacs who would line up at the door, previously unwilling to cough up the $30 co-pay for the laundry list of diseases they thought they may have? Wouldn't that be worth the $30 loss from a financial standpoint?

5 comments:

novac robert said...

realy interesting...

Becky Johnson said...

I think this would only make fiscal sense depending on he insurance. For most private insurance companies, yes, because they over pay for services so you would still make a net gain. For most government funded current programs such as public aide, medicaid, etc, they actually pay less than it costs to care for that patient, so you would be even more in the hole if you're accepting those patients. So if you can be discriminatory about who you wave the co-pay for...the line 'em up!

Arcane Rest said...

I think it may be illegal for the provider to do so. The basis of a co-pay is to make the insured think twice about the healthcare provision that patient desires. The patient must ask themselves is this worth the $30-50 copay to see the MD. Insurance companies control costs by making people second guess their desire to seek medical attention, e.g. $100 ER visit copay.

Crap i have a cut on my hand! Hmm, is it worth the 100, nope....bandage please inexperienced at bandaging wife.

Bobby Teenager said...

Currently figuring out health plan choices with Meghan and my new jobs...mine offers 4 options, hers offers 6, all with varying premiums, deductibles, out of pcket maximums, co-pays, % coverages, prescription co-pays, etc. Add in having to decide whether we should each be on our own, both be on one, take into consideration the $25-50 penalty if you go on one even though your spouse has insurance through their work, then think about if you want to ever start a family... oh and dont forget dental and vision. We are ready to send it off to NASA to get figured out. Starting to think Canada has the right idea...

Arcane Rest said...

hmmm...sounds like you have to make an important decision. Isn't that what America is all about? Giving you many options and having to make a decision that will make the most sense economically/fiscally. For me, I would rather have many choices that I can choose from and see what would make sense for me, instead of having 1 'choice' that I have little say.